Nap Tyme

Exchanges of whatever comes to mind - not necessarily boat related

Nap Tyme

Postby Keith Morris » Mon Dec 05, 2016 8:53 pm

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Postby Marin Faure » Mon Dec 05, 2016 9:20 pm

Talk about asleep at the switch. Dollars to doughnuts the cruiser was on autopilot and the skipper was doing something else. A possible giveaway would be the cruiser's returning to its original heading after being knocked off course by the ferry's stern.

As the cruiser hit the stern of the ferry the ferry would have crossed the bow of the cruiser with the cruiser approaching the port side of the ferry. This would have had the ferry approaching the cruiser from off the cruiser's starboard bow which would have made the ferry the stand-on vessel.

At least that's the way I see it...
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Postby JoMeKe » Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:51 pm

I would have to disagree with Marin. It seems clear from the relative movement of the landmass in the background and of the water ripples that the video was shot from the bow of the ferry, reinforced by the fact that there is no prop wash visible beyond the cruiser except right at the ferry as it was obviously put in reverse upon impact as well as the way the cruiser was pushed upon impact. I would say that the cruiser was off the ferry's starboard bow and was impacted by the bow of the ferry, making the cruiser the stand-on vessel. That said, I would never stand my ground with a ferry just because I thought I had the right-of-way. And regs also essentially state that if impact appears imminent, actions should be taken to avoid collision no matter who is stand-on. Good luck with this one, WSF. And I agree the cruiser skipper was obviously not paying attention.
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Postby bill.read » Tue Dec 06, 2016 10:43 am

In total agreement with you Ken....it appears that reverse action by the ferry captain limited damage to the cruiser...could have been much worse...
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Postby GB42-267 » Tue Dec 06, 2016 12:41 pm

What happened is clear from the video, who's at fault is another issue. On the water, it's not as black and white as on land. The ferry was the give way vessel while the cruiser was the stand on vessel. There is no special rule for ferries in this instance. However, as Ken states action must be taken to avoid a collision, regardless if you have the right away or not. The only exception to the rule is if a vessel have restricted maneuverability or not under command, which in this case is not a factor.
It is common practice and courtesy to give the ferries a wide berth and let them have the right away, at least I do since I'm not on a tight schedule and it takes a lot less for me to change course or slow down than the much larger ferry. It will be interesting to see what the outcome will be (if we ever find out). I suspect it will come down to a shared responsibility at some degree since the cruiser didn't even slow down to avoid the crash and the ferry to carry most of the fault since the cruiser was the stand on vessel.
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Postby Marin Faure » Tue Dec 06, 2016 2:39 pm

This was on the news yesterday. Ken, you are correct with regards to the direction the ferry was going. I was wrong on that.

The skipper of the cruiser admittd his boat was on autopilot and he was in the head and didn't see the situation developing. Boats come very close to ferries all the time so I can see how the crew of this one might have thought the cruiser would change course or slow down until it didn't.

Seems from this incident that Google, Apple, etc. should be workng on self-driving boats as well as cars. :) As I learned in 37 years of working in the commercial aviation industry removing humans from the flight deck will greatly reduce the number of accidents. The same is obviously true of vessels.

PS-- The news this morning said the ferry followed all protocol, blowing its horn repeatedly and then going into reverse. As a result the ferry was almost completely stopped when the collision occurred according to the report. Borh vessels were inspected and no damage to either one was reported.
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Postby GB42-267 » Tue Dec 06, 2016 3:57 pm

I ran across this on "Three Sheet Northwest" where they had a posting of this incident, a pretty lame excuse from Clarke Swanson, the "crash victim".
Clarke Swanson December 5, 2016 at 10:09 pm #
You don’t know what happened unless you were there. I am the one that go hit. I didn’t see him. That was my mistake. I have been in auto accidents but that is the hardest I have ever been hit. Everything on this boat ended up on the floor. Every cabinet, closet, cupboard, light fixture, furniture, tv, directv box, internet modem, electronic items, i.e. radar, gps, radio, stereo, tools, tool boxes, and everything else that was above floor level. It will cost me but I am alive and no diesel was spilled. That was the main concern of the USCG.

Further down I found this comment from Devon J Liles, another boater having an unpleasant experience. Apparently, this Swanson fellow have a history and should stay away from boating.
Devon J Liles December 5, 2016 at 7:19 pm #
Nap Tyme did the same to me this last fall. She was overtaking me from my port side the proceeded to pull in front me causing me to slow down and alter course to avoid a collision. I blew my horn, but she just kept on going..

It's very easy to be a critic after someone else have screwed up, but come on, really!!! If this guy was downstairs in the head when it happened, why in the hell didn't he just stop and drift while doing his business. I've done my fair share of single handling and when nature call, I don't do so going full bore on auto pilot. That may be fine on a sunny day in the open ocean but not so in an area with other traffic.
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Postby Marin Faure » Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:00 pm

Given that this fellow has been "in auto accidents" (plural) plus the apparent earlier near-miss incident described in Bjorn's post, it's hard not to assume that he is simply a really inattentive, unmindful person, one perhaps ignorant of things like regulations, procedures and lacking common-sense forethought. The fact he seemed amazed by the effects of the collision--- things falling out of cabinets, etc.-- tends to indicate a very diminished sense of reality and its consequences.

I suppose a positive spin would be to say it's fortunate that he apparently doesn't boat in the waters we frequent. :?
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