Cruising in a Sportfish Convertible ????

Cruising in a Sportfish Convertible ????

Postby Bert Ram » Mon Jul 29, 2013 9:24 am

Are there any folks out there who cruise in a Sportfish Convertible model boat?

I like trawlers and I also like Sportfish/Convertible model boats. And I was just wondering if anyone has cruised in a non trawler?

There are some pretty good deals out in the market place on Post 43 and Bertram 38.

I realize that trawlers offer more economy & room, but I was just wondering if a sportfish model was run at 1000 rpm or 1200 rpm if the same fuel economy could be attained?

Any thoughts?
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Postby windance » Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:53 pm

My two cents,
There are two major issues as I see it. First consideratoin is/are the engine/engines. Diesels need to,be run at some load to properly warm upand burn fuel. Continuously running them un loaded willresult in early wear and possible failure as a result of unburned fuel washing the oilmfrom the cylinder walls. The second consideration is the hull form of the boat. Typical sport cruisers will tend to wallow and be uncomfortablebat the slow speeds you are contemplating.
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Postby Bert Ram » Mon Jul 29, 2013 9:24 pm

That is kind of what I thought also. We used to fish (trolling) at around 10 knots which required running the 2 diesels at about 1200 to 1500 rpm. After trolling for about 3 or 4 hours, if we pulled in the lines and decided to try another area there would be a big puff of black smoke when we were getting up on plane. I would assume this was the unburned diesel fuel.

My boat was a 1981 Bertram 38' w/deep vee hull. At 10 knots we were pushing a good size wave off of the bow. Large enough for porpoises to surf on the waves. I did not however feel uncomfortable with the ride at that speed. I am not clear on what you meant by an uncomfortable ride.

Thanks for your response. :)
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Postby kdibnah » Tue Jul 30, 2013 12:11 am

I think if you want to cruise you can do it on a plank with a paddle. A nice semi-displacement hull is comfortable on a long haul - there's nothing better than noodling along a 8-ish knots while the galley slave makes pots of tea or coffee and sandwiches. I personally hate staring directly in front of the boat at speed, looking for deadheads; I much prefer looking at the view. However, you could be long gone in your Bertram if conditions get bad while the displacement hull will still be in the thick of it. I have a friend who cruises in a 37 point something Trojan with Crusaders and he is very happy. He noodles along at 8 to 10 knots and has no trouble enjoying himself. When he ran to Bamfield from Victoria, he did it at 18 knots and was anchored, having his second drink before the trawlers arrived.
There are some good bargains out there now, gas engines and sailboats are dime a dozen. I would think a nice Bertram (etc) with a pair of Cats would be nice, although its not really my cup of tea, as I prefer a single.

I have a confession. I went to Fisherman's Cove today to look at a (cough) Pilothouse Bayliner. I was attracted by the size (45) and the price and it was a good learning experience. It was horrible. When I pointed out that the radar arch was collapsing under its own weight and wobbled when I walked by, the broker said "they all do that." It had a 3 foot draft! I could only stand up in one of the two showers and when you lifted the hatch to "the engine room," each cylinder head was perhaps an inch below the cover. When you stood in the wheelhouse, you could only just see over the bow, you had to bend over or sit to see straight ahead. It was built as if all the machinery was installed in an empty hull, then they dropped the top half on and glued it in place. The pilothouse was finished in black, which really got my attention in this current hot weather.

Anyway, I broke the broker's heart. The difference to my mind is the (old, my only experience) GBs all come with a soul installed. The Bayliners and that ilk, those boats that have mouse fur or vinyl glued on the walls in the staterooms don't. They are meant to be tied in Prideau Haven after having gotten there as fast as plastically possible and the inhabitants either repair to their Jetskis or get immediately drunk. Therefore, as a party barge, they are probably perfect. Just not a boat. I apologize if I have offended anyone. Bertrams are better.
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Postby Bert Ram » Tue Jul 30, 2013 8:51 am

Beached,

Thanks for your response. I am not interested in using a Sportfish/Convertible to cruise so that I can run at 20 knots. I still like the slow pace that you mention; 8 knots is fine with me.

The reason I am looking at Post 43 and Bertram 38 is because I know these boats. No surprises; I know how they ride in rough seas and I like the idea of having the extra speed if it is needed.

The one thing that I continue going back to is the full master stateroom on the GB 42. That is really nice. We chartered a GB 42 back in 1999 in St. Thomas and it had the full aft stateroom. I loved it! The Post 43 that I am looking at has a queen berth in the bow but it leaves a lot to be desired in the spacious aspect of the stateroom. The GB 42 is just an awesome boat! :)

One other question: on a GB w/ twin screw, will the boat spin around in its own radius by putting one engine in forward and the other one in reverse? I ask this question because of the deep keel semi displacement hull configuration.

Thanks :)
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